give me the aerial photography


This was pictures of landscapes and my truck, or just pictures of other trucks and other landscapes. I post a lot of images of maps some of which are original and some from other blogs. @MapHawk


Via NOAA wildfire points and smoke areas for August 22nd.

Via NOAA wildfire points and smoke areas for August 22nd.

Tom Miller “Who Owns West Virginia?” (1974)

talking about neighboring bioregions with Sammy

talking about neighboring bioregions with Sammy

mollitudo:

This makes me wonder: what about creeks or springs? So many of the smaller bodies of running water in and around DC are springs, creeks, channels, though also several branches and runs. The many names for water!

This is an awesome infographic map!  As someone who works in Appalachia and is constantly looking up HUC Reach Codes, and other hydrographic data for the region I can confirm the prevalence of the terms branch, run and fork in this region.  What is a “wash?”  I’ve never even heard of that one before.  Since these seem to mostly be in parts of the country that are flat and dry, it would make sense.  When it does rain in the SW, that water is going to move very fast and very wide and wash the basin out.
The underlying spatial data they are using here is the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD), which is free and easy to download although it is quite a large file so I recommend downloading the state versions (if you were thinking of doing that).  I do wonder - why didn’t the cartographer here do anything for the regions of the map that were left off?  Since every stream section in the NHD has a name attribute it shouldn’t have been too much work to code the rest for symboligization … . 

mollitudo:

This makes me wonder: what about creeks or springs? So many of the smaller bodies of running water in and around DC are springs, creeks, channels, though also several branches and runs. The many names for water!

This is an awesome infographic map!  As someone who works in Appalachia and is constantly looking up HUC Reach Codes, and other hydrographic data for the region I can confirm the prevalence of the terms branch, run and fork in this region.  What is a “wash?”  I’ve never even heard of that one before.  Since these seem to mostly be in parts of the country that are flat and dry, it would make sense.  When it does rain in the SW, that water is going to move very fast and very wide and wash the basin out.

The underlying spatial data they are using here is the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD), which is free and easy to download although it is quite a large file so I recommend downloading the state versions (if you were thinking of doing that).  I do wonder - why didn’t the cartographer here do anything for the regions of the map that were left off?  Since every stream section in the NHD has a name attribute it shouldn’t have been too much work to code the rest for symboligization … . 

Via my buddy Adam

kidontheroad:

A good reason to be suspect of anyone telling you that they “worked hard for everything they have” and so there’s no reason to share, think collectively, or even conserve resources.  It’s all stolen land.

The truth comes out

When people ask me what I do and I explain, their response is often “cartography!” and I have to explain a little.  While these programs do let you design maps, and I do design maps if you want it done right you need to talk a real designer.  I’m not actually much of a designer.  I’m the guy that gets the data and makes sure that things are accurate and at the necessary precision.  This is one of the last drafts of the map that I’ll make for this project, before I pass all the vectors off to my buddy Dan who will then design the package for the speakers.  There’s other data I still need to pull, like high resolution aerial photography for the image background, but until I get better at Illustrator (need access to Illustrator again) I’m not going to be much use trying to design a package design on my laptop.  I should also take some time to track down a shareware design software.  Knowing the internet these days, there’s probably something out there that’s alright.

audio masons draft 4

audio masons draft 3
Everything is extracted somewhere … .
Everything is extracted somewhere … . 
I’m working for a company called Audiomasons that makes some awesome futuristic speakers.  Right now I’m just coming up with a basic map graphic that shows where their materials come from.  Audiomason’s extracts silica to use to create the material used for their speakers.  As usual, this is at first just a simple mapping project, but it’s also ample fodder to think about larger issues of extraction and consumption.  Audiomason’s speakers are high quality, and don’t have a trace of planned obsolescence about them: they are made of a porcelain-like material that is self-cleaning.  From what I’ve found out so far, whether silica extraction is destroying someone’s watershed is a question of the site standards, and whether the sandstone or limestone they’re digging it out of is acidic or not.  I’ve taken this project because I also figure there are thousands of companies extracting silica around the globe.  This producer wants to use mapping to educate their customers on where materials are extracted from.  That can’t be a bad thing, right? #Liberalismin170words

Everything is extracted somewhere … .

I’m working for a company called Audiomasons that makes some awesome futuristic speakers.  Right now I’m just coming up with a basic map graphic that shows where their materials come from.  Audiomason’s extracts silica to use to create the material used for their speakers.  As usual, this is at first just a simple mapping project, but it’s also ample fodder to think about larger issues of extraction and consumption.  Audiomason’s speakers are high quality, and don’t have a trace of planned obsolescence about them: they are made of a porcelain-like material that is self-cleaning.  From what I’ve found out so far, whether silica extraction is destroying someone’s watershed is a question of the site standards, and whether the sandstone or limestone they’re digging it out of is acidic or not.  I’ve taken this project because I also figure there are thousands of companies extracting silica around the globe.  This producer wants to use mapping to educate their customers on where materials are extracted from.  That can’t be a bad thing, right? #Liberalismin170words

michigan audio masons draft 1 on Flickr.
Everything is extracted somewhere … .
Light pollution in the USA.  The Upper Peninsula is dark.

Light pollution in the USA.  The Upper Peninsula is dark.

Map porn

I gotta find more maps of America at a weird rotation

I gotta find more maps of America at a weird rotation

Isle Royale National Park


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The last glacier receded from this area about 10,000 years ago.  As the glaciers melted, they formed a huge lake which  permanently separated Isle Royale from the mainland.  Today, the coolness of the big lake (Lake Superior) creates a climate in which artic plant species grow.”


Twilight in Isle Royale National Park

Starting to plan my trip to the Upper Peninsula


View The Slowening in a larger map

Arc of the Trip (May 2012)
0. 4th: leave Ann Arbor for Chicago
1. night of the 7th: JW Wells State Park
2. 8th: Big Falls State Park/ Paulding Light in the evening
4. 9th Craig Lake State Park (yurt reserved)
3. 10th: Fort Wilkins State Park (planning on reserving a beach cabin)
4. 11th. Little Presque State Park
5. 12th: Brown Fisheries Fish House and Paradise, MI (camping at Taquamon Falls?)
6. 13th-14th: head back to AA, then NYC (end dates not set)